Past Years

2018 / 2017 / 2016 / 2015 / 2014 / 2013 / 2012 / 2011 / 2010 / 2009 / 2008 / 2007

Applying Trendy Technologies to NASA Mission Operations Planning

by Mark Powell

Mark Powell presents examples of how NASA uses innovative technologies in missions such as Mars Exploration Rovers, the Cassini Saturn Orbiter, the Phoenix Mars Lander as well as new technology projects including the JPL Aerobot and the ATHLETE prototype lunar robotic vehicle.

Speaker Bio:

Mark Powell is a Senior Computer Scientist at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA since 2001, being the product lead for the Mars Science Laboratory mission science planning interface (MSLICE).

Everything I Ever Learned about JVM Performance Tuning @twitter

by Attila Szegedi

Attila Szegedi shares lessons learned tuning the JVM at Twitter, spending most of his talk discussing memory tuning, CPU usage tuning, and lock contention tuning.

Speaker Bio:

Attila Szegedi is a Principal Member of the Technical Staff at Oracle. He is also known for his work on several Open Source projects, most notably he is a contributor to Mozilla Rhino, Kiji, Dynalink and the FreeMarker templating language runtime.

Scala: Simplifying Development at guardian.co.uk

by Graham Tackley

Graham Tackley shares the lessons learned running The Guardian website on Java, and why they decided to switch to Scala and how it helps them.

Speaker Bio:

Graham Tackley is the Web Platform Team Lead for guardian.co.uk and a Pragmatic Scala Adopter.

Web Development: You're Doing It Wrong

by Stefan Tilkov

Stefan Tilkov challenges many commonly-held assumptions about how to best develop web applications, emphasizing the strengths and ideal roles for HTML, CSS, JavaScript, HTTP and URIs.

Speaker Bio:

Stefan Tilkov is Co-founder and Principal Consultant at innoQ, where he spends his time alternating between advising customers on new technologies and taking the blame from his co-workers for doing so.

A Call for Sanity in NoSQL

by Nathan Marz

Nathan Marz discusses building NoSQL-based data systems that are scalable and easy to reason about.

Speaker Bio:

Nathan Marz is the creator of many open source projects which are relied upon by over 50 companies around the world, including Cascalog and Storm.

Exploiting Loopholes in CAP

by Michael Nygard

Michael Nygard discusses several loopholes in the CAP theorem that can be used to engineer practical, real-world systems with desirable features.

Speaker Bio:

Michael Nygard has written and co-authored several books, including "Release It!", "Beautiful Architecture", "97 Things Every Software Architect Should Know" and "Java Developer’s Reference".

Understanding and Using Regular Expressions

by Damian Conway

Damian Conway discusses what regexes really are, how they actually work, and how programmers can make use of their existing software development skills to construct correct and efficient regexes. 

Speaker Bio:

Damian Conway is a well-known member of the international Perl community. A widely sought-after speaker and teacher, he is also the author of several technical books as well as numerous Perl software modules.

Practicing at the Cutting Edge

by Martin Thompson

Martin Thompson focuses on the evolution of Java and how it contrasts to C/C++, covering the cultural challenges of pushing the limits of performance and how to collaborate with industry experts and organize teams, which often stands at odds with the culture in many organisations.

Speaker Bio:

Martin Thompson is a high-performance and low-latency specialist, with over two decades working with large scale transactional and big-data systems, in the automotive, gaming, financial, mobile, and CMS domains.

Organizational Change Myths - Introduction and Sustainability

by Linda Rising

Linda Rising challenges organizational myths like "it's enough to have smart people" or "just have a transition plan and explain it" and it will work out, introducing and sustaining new ideas.

Speaker Bio:

Linda Rising has a Ph.D. from Arizona State University in the field of object-based design metrics and a background that includes university teaching and industry work in telecommunications, avionics, and strategic weapons systems.

Lambdas & Streams

by Simon Ritter

Simon Ritter discusses the syntax and use of Lambda expressions, focusing on using Streams to greatly simplify the way bulk and aggregate operations are handled in Java.

Speaker Bio:

Simon Ritter is a Java Technology Evangelist at Oracle Corporation. Simon has been in the IT business since 1984 and holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Physics from Brunel University in the U.K.

Back to the Future

Emma Langman explores the usefulness of some of the Quality tools that have been around since the 50s for gathering requirements, tackling repeat problems, or innovating more efficiently as a team.

Speaker Bio:

Emma Langman is the Manager of HR and Performance at Kuwait Energy, and lives in Kuwait City.

Simple Made Easy

Rich Hickey discusses simplicity, why it is important, how to achieve it in design and how to recognize its absence in the tools, language constructs and libraries.

Speaker Bio:

Rich Hickey, the author of Clojure, is an independent software designer, consultant and application architect with over 20 years of experience in all facets of software development.

The Power of Abstraction

Abstraction is at the center of much work in Computer Science. It encompasses finding the right interface for a system as well as finding an effective design for a system implementation.

Speaker Bio:

Barbara Liskov is an Institute Professor at MIT, a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the National Academy of Sciences, a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and a fellow of the ACM.

Fault Tolerance 101

by Joe Armstrong

Joe Armstrong describes the foundations of fault tolerant computation and the basic properties a system should have in order to be able to function in an adequate manner despite the occurrence of hardware and software errors, summarizing the key features of Erlang clusters.

Speaker Bio:

Joe Armstrong is the principle inventor of the Erlang programming Language and coined the term "Concurrency Oriented Programming".

Null References: The Billion Dollar Mistake

by Tony Hoare

Tony Hoare introduced Null references in ALGOL W back in 1965 “simply because it was so easy to implement”, says Mr. Hoare. He talks about that decision considering it “my billion-dollar mistake”.

Speaker Bio:

Sir Charles Antony Richard Hoare, commonly known as Tony Hoare, is a British computer scientist, probably best known for the development in 1960, at age 26, of Quicksort.

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