You are viewing content from a past/completed QCon

Presentation: Ethos(s): Enabling Community and Culture

Track: Tech Ethics: The Intersection of Human Welfare & STEM

Location: St James, 4th flr.

Duration: 1:40pm - 2:30pm

Day of week: Wednesday

Share this on:

This presentation is now available to view on InfoQ.com

Watch video with transcript

Abstract

The legitimacy of open source as a software development model is undeniable.  Where companies once feared, they now consume, and even contribute; where viability as a business model was once questioned, there now are venture capital firms, profitability, initial public offerings, and acquisitions.   

 

Open source is no longer simply the domain of hackers and hobbyists: we, as users, contributors, maintainers, and cat herders, are all part of the open source ecosystem, frequently by way of our employment and career paths, not our spare time.  The broader open source community’s long-standing ethical principles and practices — “free as in freedom,” “with enough eyes, all bugs are shallow” — have brought open source a long way from its roots. 

 

In a world where open source projects, and the communities behind them, are inextricably tied to either the operation or the revenue generation of our employers — how can we, as contributors, maintainers, and nurturers of those projects, balance our employer’s interests without sacrificing the culture, ethical principles, and practices that are known to enable successful communities?  How do we illustrate to the business that community can be a force multiplier — which is a good thing — but that there are lines not to be crossed?   

 

This session examines the ethical principles and practices of open source community architecture that empower contributor influence and participation, drawn from both real-world examples and research. It also provides guidance to consumers and creators of open source software, for-profit or otherwise, on how to influence a community’s culture and success, as well as how to influence corporate involvement towards good, and not evil.

Speaker: Robyn Bergeron

Principal Community Architect for @Ansible, @RedHat

As Ansible’s Community Architect, Robyn Bergeron focuses on building bridges between Ansible and other open source communities, as well as steadily scaling Ansible’s framework for collaboration and contribution as the community continues to grow. Robyn has been a sysadmin, program manager, business analyst, and developer advocate in past lives, and started her career in open source at Red Hat, where she was the Fedora Project Leader — and she continues to follow her passion of inspiring, enabling, and empowering contributors today at Red Hat as leader of the Ansible community team.

Find Robyn Bergeron at

Tracks

  • Architectures You've Always Wondered About

    Hard-earned lessons from the names you know on scalability, reliability, security, and performance.

  • Machine Learning: The Latest Innovations

    AI and machine learning is more approachable than ever. Discover how ML, deep learning, and other modern approaches are being used in practice.

  • Kubernetes and Cloud Architectures

    Learn about cloud native architectural approaches from the leading industry experts who have operated Kubernetes and FaaS at scale, and explore the associated modern DevOps practices.

  • Evolving Java

    JVM futures, JIT directions and improvements to the runtimes stack is the theme of this year’s JVM track.

  • Next Generation Microservices: Building Distributed Systems the Right Way

    Microservice-based applications are everywhere, but well-built distributed systems are not so common. Early adopters of microservices share their insights on how to design systems the right way.

  • Chaos and Resilience: Architecting for Success

    Making systems resilient involves people and tech. Learn about strategies being used, from cognitive systems engineering to chaos engineering.

  • The Future of the API: REST, gRPC, GraphQL and More

    The humble web-based API is evolving. This track provides the what, how, and why of future APIs.

  • Streaming Data Architectures

    Today's systems move huge volumes of data. Hear how the innovators in this space are designing systems and leveraging modern data stream processing platforms.

  • Modern Compilation Targets

    Learn about the innovation happening in the compilation target space. WebAssembly is only the tip of the iceberg.

  • Leaving the Ivory Tower: Modern CS Research in the Real World

    Thoughts pushing software forward, including consensus, CRDT's, formal methods & probabilistic programming.

  • Bare Knuckle Performance

    Crushing latency and getting the most out of your hardware.

  • Leading Distributed Teams

    Remote and distributed working are increasing in popularity, but many organisations underestimate the leadership challenges. Learn from those who are doing this effectively.

  • Full Cycle Developers: Lead the People, Manage the Process & Systems

    "Full cycle developers" is not just another catch phrase; it's about engineers taking ownership and delivering value, and doing so with the support of their entire organisation. Learn more from the pioneers.

  • JavaScript: Pushing the Client Beyond the Browser

    JavaScript is not just the language of the web. Join this track to learn how the innovators are pushing the boundaries of this classic language and ecosystem.

  • When Things Go Wrong: GDPR, Ethics, & Politics

    Privacy, confidentiality, safety and security: learning from the frontlines, from both good and bad experiences

  • Growing Unicorns in the EU: Building, Leading and Scaling Financial Tech Start Ups

    Learn how EU FinTech innovators have designed, built, and led both their technologies and organisations.

  • Building High Performing Teams

    To have a high-performing team, everybody on it has to feel and act like an owner. Learn about cultivating culture, creating psychological safety, sharing the vision effectively, and more

  • Scaling Security, from Device to Cloud

    Implementing effective security is vitally important, regardless of where you are deploying software applications.