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Presentation: Panel: The Correct Number of Microservices for a System Is 489

Track: Speaker AMAs (Ask Me Anything)

Location: Whittle, 3rd flr.

Duration: 2:55pm - 3:45pm

Day of week: Tuesday

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Abstract

New research from the University of Sledgham-on-the-Wold has revealed that the correct number of microservices for any software system is exactly 489. Given that, why have so many organisations used a different number of microservices? More seriously though... every situation is different, and determining how to properly employ a microservices architecture for your circumstances can be tricky. In this session the panel will discuss the architecture of their various systems, what trade-offs they have made in their design of their systems, and how their system has evolved over time.

Speaker: Suhail Patel

Backend Engineer @Monzo

Suhail is a Backend Engineer at Monzo focused on working on the core Platform. His role involves building and maintaining Monzo's infrastructure which spans hundreds of microservices and leverages key infrastructure components like Kubernetes, Cassandra, Etcd and more. He focuses specifically in investigating deviant behaviour and ensuring services continue to work reliably in the face of a constantly shifting environment in the cloud.

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Speaker: Jason Maude

Lead Engineer @StarlingBank

Jason Maude is a coder, coach, debater, and public speaker. He has over a decade of experience working in the financial sector, primarily in creating and delivering software. He is passionate about creating teams and explaining complex technical concepts to those who are convinced that they won't be able to understand them. He currently works at Starling Bank as one of their lead engineers and host of the Starling podcast.

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Speaker: Nicky Wrightson

Principal Engineer @Skyscanner

Nicky has extensive experience delivering large scale cloud native architectures previously at the Financial Times and now at Skyscanner. She passionately promotes operability as a first class concern in developing these large distributed systems. She works now on the data platform at Skyscanner where the huge scale means a whole different set of problems to solve while still striving to be operable, cost effective and maintainable.

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Speaker: Sarah Wells

Technical Director for Operations and Reliability @FT (Financial Times)

Sarah Wells has been a developer for 15 years, leading delivery teams across consultancy, financial services and media. Over the last few years she has developed a deep interest in operability, observability and devops, and at the beginning of 2018 this led to her taking over responsibility for Operations and Reliability at the Financial Times.  

Before that, she led work at the FT on building a semantic publishing platform, making it easy to discover and access all the FT’s published content via APIs in a common and flexible format. That project meant a focus on Go, microservices, containerisation, and how to influence teams to do the right things.

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